Dlinza Forest Aerial Boardwalk

The Dlinza Forest Aerial Boardwalk in Eshowe is a 150 metre long walkway built above the Dlinza Forest floor, which allows visitors to view flora, fauna and avifauna at treetop level. It includes a 20 metre high tower, offering dramatic views of both the forest canopy and surrounding countryside.

Towering trees in the Dlinza forest

The boardwalk employs a number of trained birding guides who are available to show visitors some of the delights of the forest.

The Dlinza Forest is a 250 hectare indigenous coastal scarp forest, and is one of The Great Five Natural Forests in Kwa Zulu Natal. (The other forests are the Ongoye, Entumeni, Nkandla and Qudeni Forests, and lie on a 100 km line running northwest from the coast.) These five forests are the most important forests in Southern Africa from the aspect of unique biodiversity.

Birding and Wildlife

The Dlinza Forest is on The Zululand Birding Route, and is home to all sorts of rare birds and little creatures. Over 90 species of birds inhabit the forest, as well as 85 different types of butterflies. On a hiking trail whilst tuning in to the happy chatter of the birds, you can spot blue duikers, bushpigs, chameleons, beetles, bushbuck and much much more.

Some of the birds that inhabit the forest:

  • Crowned Eagle
  • Narina Trogon
  • Spotted Ground Thrush
  • Green Twinspot
  • Purple Crested Lourie
  • Eastern Bronze-naped Pigeon
  • Chorister Robin-chat
  • Olive Woodpecker
  • Trumpeter Hornbill
  • Delegorgue’s Pigeon

Some of the butterflies you can spot floating about:

  • Citrus Swallowtail
  • Dusky Veined Acrae
  • Blue Spotted Charaxes
  • Mocker Swallowtail
  • Emperor Swallowtail

And, of course, home to the birds, butterflies and Bushbabies, are the wonderful trees that make up the Dlinza Forest:

  • Forest Ironplum
  • Giant Umzibeet
  • Natal Milkplum
  • Wild Plum
  • Cabbage Tree
  • Myrtle Quince
  • Fluted Milkplum
  • Forest Knobwood
  • Flat Crown
  • Forest Mahogany

There are two hiking trails through the forest which are best done in the early hours of the morning or the late afternoon when the birds are at their chirpiest.